Shea Butter

We use only unrefined pure Shea Butter in our Hair and Body Cream

Shea butter is a rich source of moisture, vitamins and fat for your skin and hair. In its natural state, shea butter is a thick, yellowish butter that liquefies at body temperature. Natural anti-inflammatory properties make it a nourishing choice for the scalp, helping to improve your hair growth and health.

History  Shea butter is a product of the shea-karite tree. The nuts from this tree are harvested, cracked, grilled and pounded. Once the nuts have been pounded, they are boiled for a long period of time and the fat, or shea butter, rises to the top. This rich unrefined shea butter is scooped out of the water and allowed to cool, according to Treasured Locks.

Types  Pure shea butter should be creamy beige in color, with a thick and spreadable consistency according to the American Shea Butter Institute. Shea butter has a characteristic smell that can help you to identify the pure, unrefined product. Opt for unrefined shea butter to make certain that the product you choose has essential vitamin A, vitamin E, phytonutrients and healing fats to help with the health of your hair and scalp, recommends the American Shea Butter Institute.

Function  Shea butter can be applied to both the hair and scalp. If your scalp is dry, irritated or flaky, shea butter may provide critical moisture and help to heal a variety of skin conditions. A healthy scalp is essential to maximize hair growth. Shea butter can also be applied to the hair to moisturize the individual strands, reducing dryness and breakage. Reduced breakage will result in longer and healthier hair over time.

Use  You can use shea butter on your scalp, your hair or both to improve the length, health and appearance of your hair. Gently warm shea butter to liquefy and work through your hair. Leave the emollient butter in place for 30 minutes or longer, wrapping your head in a hot towel for additional warmth. Wash out with shampoo and follow with conditioner. You can also use shea butter as a styling cream, particularly if you have damaged or curly hair. Rub a very small amount of shea butter between your hands, then apply to the hair. Keep the shea butter away from the roots of the hair to avoid making your hair look greasy or unwashed.

Warning  While shea butter is quite safe and can be beneficial for the skin and hair, you should avoid shea butter or shea butter products if you have tree nut allergies. There are no clinical trials concerning shea butter and allergies. Consult your allergist or health care provider if you have further questions.

(source livestrong)

 

Rawdah products are Phthalates Free!

How to Avoid Phthalates In 3 Steps

Phthalates mimic hormones and have been linked to numerous health problems, but remain legal.

In the wake of news today linking baby powder, lotion and shampoo to higher levels of phthalates in babies’ bodies, many parents are looking for answers about avoiding products that contain them.

Phthalates are known as “endocrine disruptors” because they mimic the body’s hormones and have, in laboratory animal tests, been shown to cause reproductive and neurological damage. (California has banned the use of phthalates in toys and baby products as of 2009.)

Unfortunately, it’s not particularly easy to avoid phthalates.

You’ll rarely find the word “phthalates” on a label (except for the occasional “phthalate-free,” which is helpful).

Here are three tips for identifying products that have, or are likely to have, phthalates or another compound that has raised similar concerns and is found in similar products, Bisphenol A.

Read the ingredients. According to the organization Pollution in People, you can identify phthalates in some products by their chemical names, or abbreviations:  1. ◦DBP (di-n-butyl phthalate) and DEP (diethyl phthalate) are often found in personal care products, including nail polishes, deodorants, perfumes and cologne, aftershave lotions, shampoos, hair gels and hand lotions. (BzBP, see below, is also in some personal care products.) ◦DEHP (di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate or Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate) is used in PVC plastics, including some medical devices.  (source thedailygreen.com) ◦BzBP (benzylbutyl phthalate) is used in some flooring, car products and personal care products. ◦DMP (dimethyl phthalate) is used in insect repellent and some plastics (as well as rocket propellant).  2.Be wary of the term “fragrance,” which is used to denote a combination of compounds, possibly including phthatates, which are a subject of recent concern because of studies showing they can mimic certain hormones.  3.Choose plastics with the recycling code 1, 2 or 5. Recycling codes 3 and 7 are more likely to contain bisphenol A or phthalates.

(source – the daily green)phthalates-free